Your rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons. The rotator cuff is responsible for keeping your arm bone secure in your shoulder’s socket. While mild rotator cuff injuries can improve on their own, this is not always the case. 

Mayo Clinic explains that rotator cuff injuries can cause permanent weakness or loss of motion. 

What are the risk factors of a rotator cuff injury? 

You may be more likely to sustain a rotator cuff injury if you work in an occupation that requires repetitive arm motion. For instance, these injuries are common in the construction industry. There may also be a genetic component to the injury. Some people are simply more prone to injuries than others. If you have family members who suffered rotator injuries in the past, it is more likely that you may suffer one when combined with other risk factors. Age can also contribute to tearing your rotator cuff. If you are over the age of 60, then you are more likely to experience a rotator cuff injury. 

What are the symptoms of a rotator cuff injury? 

The symptoms of a rotator cuff injury include arm weakness accompanied by a deep ache in your shoulder. You may have difficulty sleeping due to pain or discomfort. You may have additional difficulties with daily tasks, such as combing your hair due to shoulder pain. 

Often, the symptoms manifest after a single injury. In other cases, it may be due to repetitive motion. For instance, if you work as a painter, you may tear your rotator cuff over time.